CCN Forum -Where to Start? Bottom-Up Attention Improves Working

Susan Ravizza, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Michigan State University

Dr. Susan Ravizza received a Ph.D in Psychology from UC Berkeley and has held postdoctoral research positions at the University of Pittsburgh and UC Davis.  She is currently an Associate Professor at Michigan State University in the Psychology Department.  Research in her lab focuses on the behavioral and neural mechanisms of cognitive control using converging methods such as fMRI, EEG, and neuropsychiatric populations.  Dr. Ravizza is the recipient of an NSF Early Career Development Award for her research on the neural processes that influence the contents of working memory. Dr. Susan Ravizza received a Ph.D in Psychology from UC Berkeley and has held postdoctoral research positions at the University of Pittsburgh and UC Davis.  She is currently an Associate Professor at Michigan State University in the Psychology Department.  Research in her lab focuses on the behavioral and neural mechanisms of cognitive control using converging methods such as fMRI, EEG, and neuropsychiatric populations.  Dr. Ravizza is the recipient of an NSF Early Career Development Award for her research on the neural processes that influence the contents of working memory.
Working memory (WM) is enhanced for items that capture attention, but little is known about how it achieves this effect. In this talk, I will provide behavioral and neural evidence that bottom-up attention is helpful only when perceptual selection demands are high. When multiple information sources compete, bottom-up attention prioritizes the location at which encoding should begin. When encoding order is set, bottom-up attention has little or no benefit to working memory. In contrast, voluntary attention improves working memory regardless of encoding order. Neural evidence from fMRI and ERP supports this hypothesis. These results suggest that bottom-up attention improves the probability that items enter WM, but voluntary attention is a better predictor of the quality of the representation.
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When and Where

East Hall - 4464

September 2017

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2:00pm - 3:00pm

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