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Presented By: Department of Psychology

Developmental Brown Bag:

Sarah Probst, Graduate Student, Developmental Psychology and Kaitlin P. Ward - Graduate Student, Joint Social Work and Developmental

Sarah Probst, Kaitlin P. Ward Sarah Probst, Kaitlin P. Ward
Sarah Probst, Kaitlin P. Ward
Sarah

Title:
Eye can Help! A Novel Tool for Exploring Infant Prosocial Behavior

Abstract:
While helping typically begins in the toddler years, little is known about prosocial behavior in infancy: are infants motivated to help others and simply unable to due to their poor motor skills? To explore this question, I have developed a novel tool for studying helping in infancy that utilizes eye-tracking and gaze-contingency. In this talk, I will discuss the development of this gaze-contingent paradigm, where infants can "help" an on-screen character by looking at particular buttons on the screen. While data collection for this study has been paused due to COVID-19, I will discuss initial insights from our first 30 pilot participants and plans for future directions.

Kaitlin

Title:
Mothers’ socioeconomic status and non-violent discipline use: A longitudinal multilevel examination.

Abstract:
The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child has called for member states to promote parental nonviolent discipline use across the globe. However, scant research has explored the predictors of nonviolent discipline use, and even less has explored how parents’ nonviolent discipline use changes across early childhood. This study examines 1) the associations between mothers’ socioeconomic status (SES) and nonviolent discipline use, and 2) the trajectory of mothers’ nonviolent discipline use across early childhood (i.e., child ages 3, 5, and 9). Data came from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N = 2,898) and were analyzed using longitudinal multilevel ordinal logistic regression. SES was measured using maternal educational attainment, maternal-reported household income, and maternal employment status. Nonviolent forms of discipline included verbal reasoning, taking away privileges, time-out, and distraction. Results showed higher maternal educational attainment was related to greater use of all nonviolent forms of discipline; household income was associated with greater use of verbal reasoning, time-out, and distraction; and maternal employment was associated with greater use of verbal reasoning. On average, mothers’ nonviolent discipline use was highest at child ages 3 and 5, and lowest at child age 9. Results suggest maternal education may be a particularly important socioeconomic predictor of nonviolent discipline use. Results also suggest mothers’ nonviolent discipline use is nonlinear across early childhood. To inform parenting policies and interventions, further research is needed to examine the mechanisms linking mothers’ SES and nonviolent discipline use.
Sarah Probst, Kaitlin P. Ward Sarah Probst, Kaitlin P. Ward
Sarah Probst, Kaitlin P. Ward

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April 19, 2021 (Monday) 12:00pm
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