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Presented By: Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

17th Annual Early Career Scientists Symposium

Racial Justice and Anti-Racist Research in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Art by John Megahan based on a photo by Nick Reo. Kanaka Maoli and Anishinaabe land and language warriors visit and exchange knowledge at Hale O Kuhio, a structure erected in 2018 to assert the unfulfilled mandate of the Hawaiian Homes Commission Act of 1920. Art by John Megahan based on a photo by Nick Reo. Kanaka Maoli and Anishinaabe land and language warriors visit and exchange knowledge at Hale O Kuhio, a structure erected in 2018 to assert the unfulfilled mandate of the Hawaiian Homes Commission Act of 1920.
Art by John Megahan based on a photo by Nick Reo. Kanaka Maoli and Anishinaabe land and language warriors visit and exchange knowledge at Hale O Kuhio, a structure erected in 2018 to assert the unfulfilled mandate of the Hawaiian Homes Commission Act of 1920.
The Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (EEB) at the University of Michigan presents the 17th Annual Early Career Scientists Symposium: Racial Justice and Anti-Racist Research in EEB. We are delighted to announce that our featured speaker, Steward Pickett, distinguished urban ecologist from the Cary Institute and this year’s eminent ecologist of the Ecological Society of America, will open the symposium. A panel discussion led by Nicholas Reo, Associate Professor of Native American Studies at Dartmouth will bring the symposium to its conclusion.

Eight early career scholars who are transforming our discipline through anti-racist and justice-centered research that pushes our understanding of the links between EEB research and society, will present their perspectives in many areas of EEB, such as Global Environmental Change, Genomics and Population Genetics, Urban Ecology and Evolution, Environmental History, STEM Education, Marine Ecology, Water Security, Theoretical Ecology and Evolution, Global Food Systems, and Disease Ecology. The goal of this symposium is to provide a space for the EEB community to think imaginatively about the future of our discipline.

The symposium will begin on Saturday, March 19, 2022 (2 - 6 pm EDT) in-person and live-streamed, followed by three consecutive virtual Fridays from March 25– April 8, 2022 (noon - 2 pm EDT). Two to three participants will present each Friday, followed by a moderated discussion.

ALL TIMES ARE EDT (Eastern Daylight Time)

While the symposium presents the work of rising early career scientists, it is open to all (i.e., you don’t have to be in your early career to attend).

REGISTRATION is required for in person and Zoom entry. You will be provided with the link and passcode upon registration. https://myumi.ch/ECSSregister

You must complete the UM ResponsiBLUE short questionnaire before you come to campus https://responsiblue.umich.edu/home

Please contact the planning committee with questions: ecss-2022@umich.edu

SPECIAL THANKS TO COSPONSORS CEW+ (Center for the Education of Women+) Irma M. Wyman Grant Program Fund and the Rackham Faculty Allies Diversity Grant!

Art by John Megahan based on a photo by Nick Reo. About the photo: Kanaka Maoli and Anishinaabe land and language warriors visit and exchange knowledge at Hale O Kuhio, a structure erected in 2018 to assert the unfulfilled mandate of the Hawaiian Homes Commission Act of 1920.
Art by John Megahan based on a photo by Nick Reo. Kanaka Maoli and Anishinaabe land and language warriors visit and exchange knowledge at Hale O Kuhio, a structure erected in 2018 to assert the unfulfilled mandate of the Hawaiian Homes Commission Act of 1920. Art by John Megahan based on a photo by Nick Reo. Kanaka Maoli and Anishinaabe land and language warriors visit and exchange knowledge at Hale O Kuhio, a structure erected in 2018 to assert the unfulfilled mandate of the Hawaiian Homes Commission Act of 1920.
Art by John Megahan based on a photo by Nick Reo. Kanaka Maoli and Anishinaabe land and language warriors visit and exchange knowledge at Hale O Kuhio, a structure erected in 2018 to assert the unfulfilled mandate of the Hawaiian Homes Commission Act of 1920.

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