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Presented By: Michigan Program in Survey and Data Science

MPSDS JPSM Seminar Series - Accounting for Non-ignorable Sampling and Nonresponse in Statistical Matching

Danny Pfeffermann - Retired as the National Statistician and Director General of Israel's CBS. He is Professor Emeritus of Statistics at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Professor of Social Statistics at the University of Southampton.

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Flyer for Accounting for Non-ignorable Sampling and Nonresponse in Statistical Matching
MPSDS JPSM Seminar Series
November 9, 2022
12:00 - 1:00 EST

Accounting for Non-ignorable Sampling and Nonresponse in Statistical Matching

Danny Pfeffermann retired as the National Statistician and Director General of Israel's CBS. He is Professor Emeritus of Statistics at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Professor of Social Statistics at the University of Southampton. His main research areas are: Analytic inference from complex sample surveys; Seasonal adjustment and trend estimation; Small area estimation; Inference under informative sampling and nonresponse and more recently; Mode effects and Proxy surveys.

Professor Pfeffermann published about 80 articles in leading statistical journals and co-edited the two-volume handbook on Sample Surveys. He is Fellow of the American Statistical Association (ASA), the International Statistical Institute (ISI) and the Institute of Mathematical Statistics (IMS), and recipient of several international awards.

Abstract
Data for statistical analysis is often available from different samples, with each sample containing measurements on only some of the variables of interest. Statistical matching attempts to generate a fused database containing matched measurements on all the target variables. In this article, we consider the use of statistical matching when the samples are drawn by informative sampling designs and are subject to not missing at random nonresponse. The problem with ignoring the sampling process and nonresponse is that the distribution of the data observed for the responding units can be very different from the distribution holding for the population data, which may distort the inference process and result in a matched database that misrepresents the joint distribution in the population. Our proposed methodology employs the empirical likelihood approach and is shown to perform well in a simulation experiment and when applied to real sample data.

Joint paper with Daniela Marella, to appear in International Statistical Review

MPSDS
The University of Michigan Program in Survey Methodology was established in 2001 seeking to train future generations of survey and data scientists. In 2021, we changed our name to the Michigan Program in Survey and Data Science. Our curriculum is concerned with a broad set of data sources including survey data, but also including social media posts, sensor data, and administrative records, as well as analytic methods for working with these new data sources. And we bring to data science a focus on data quality — which is not at the center of traditional data science. The new name speaks to what we teach and work on at the intersection of social research and data. The program offers doctorate and master of science degrees and a certificate through the University of Michigan. The program's home is the Institute for Social Research, the world's largest academically-based social science research institute.

SISRT
The mission of the Summer Institute is to provide rigorous and high quality graduate training in all phases of survey research. The program teaches state-of-the-art practice and theory in the design, implementation, and analysis of surveys. The Summer Institute in Survey Research Techniques has presented courses on the sample survey since the summer of 1948, and has offered such courses every summer since. Graduate-level courses through the Program in Survey and Data Science are offered from June 5 through July 28 and available to enroll in as a Summer Scholar.

The Summer Institute uses the sample survey as the basic instrument for the scientific measurement of human activity. It presents sample survey methods in courses designed to meet the educational needs of those specializing in social and behavioral research such as professionals in business, public health, natural resources, law, medicine, nursing, social work, and many other domains of study.
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