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Department of Psychology pres.

Developmental Brown Bag:

Michael Demidenko, Graduate Student Developmental Psychology and Lolita Moss, MSW, Graduate Student Social Work and Developmental Psychology

Demidenko and Moss Demidenko and Moss
Demidenko and Moss
Michael Demidenko

Title:
Adolescent Health Risk Behaviors: Convergent, Discriminant and Predictive Validity of Self-Report and Cognitive Measures

Abstract:
Self-report and cognitive tasks of reward sensitivity and self-regulation have influenced several developmental models that may explain the heightened engagement in risk behaviors during adolescence. Despite some inconsistencies across studies, few studies have explored the convergent, discriminant, and predictive validity of self-report and cognitive measures of these psychological characteristics in adolescence. The present study evaluated the convergent and discriminant validity of self-report and cognitive measures of reward sensitivity and self-regulation among 2017 adolescents (age M = 16.8, SD = 1.1; 56% female; 55% White, 22% Black, 8% Hispanic, 15% other race/ethnic; 49% 10th grade and 51% 12th grade). This study compared the predictive validity of an omnibus measure and specific measures of risk engagement. Convergent and discriminant validity from self-report to cognitive tasks were as predicted, although with weak convergent relationships. As hypothesized, compared to cognitive tasks, self-report measures consistently predicted risky behaviors and explained more variance in the models. These results demonstrate that while cognitive tasks can significantly predict certain risk behaviors, they require increased power to find the very small effects, raising questions about their use as implicit proxies for real world risk behavior.

Lolita Moss

Title:
Connecting Media Use and Acceptance of Intimate Partner Violence Among Black Young Adults

Abstract:
Although scholars have found connections between mainstream media consumption and acceptance of intimate partner violence (IPV), little is known about the specific mechanisms that connect media use to endorsement of such violence. Understanding this connection is particularly relevant for Black Americans because Black women report higher rates of intimate partner violence than do White women (Al’Uqdah, Maxwell, & Hill, 2016), and Black Americans consume more media than the general population (Rideout, Lauricella, & Wartella, 2011). Accordingly, this study tested these connections among Black adults, investigating contributions of their consumption of movies, music videos, and 52 popular television programs to their acceptance of dating violence. Our survey of 369 Black young adults also tested three potential mediators using SEM: sexual objectification, heterosexual script, and two stereotypes about Black women, the Sapphire and the Jezebel. Results from parallel mediation analyses indicated that heavier exposure to all three media predicted higher levels of the three mediators, which in turn predicted greater acceptance of IPV.
Demidenko and Moss Demidenko and Moss
Demidenko and Moss

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